Podcast #15: Wearable Technology and The Future of Pregnancy

“If pregnancy were a book, they’d cut the last two chapters.”–Nora Ephron

It seems that every other person is wearing a fitness tracker these days.  I am one of them.   But wearable bio-medical devices aren’t just for normal activity.  They are being developed, marketed, and used to monitor a variety of health conditions,  seemingly for just about everything and everyone. Now–yes–even unborn babies have a wearable health monitor.   Developed an marketed by San Francisco-based Bloomlife,  it tracks a variety of parameters during the course of pregnancy.  You might call it a fitness tracker for the unborn baby.

In this episode,  Bloomlife CEO and co-founder, Eric Dy,  talks about the origin and functions of their breakthrough device,  where it and the market for wearable health trackers are going,  and how he and his partner won a trip to Neckar Island–just one of three companies out of 1300 competing in a tech innovation contest–to present to Richard Branson

 

 

Links to relevant stories appear after the audio file and embedded YouTube video below.  A reminder that Seeking Delphi is available on iTunes, PlayerFM, and has a channel on YouTube.  You can also follow us on Facebook.

The Bloomlife tracker in action

Episode #15: A Fitness Tracker for The Unborn Baby

 

YouTube slides show of Seeking Delphi podcast #15

 

 

 

Bloomlife wins extreme tech innovation competition

Incidence of hunger to increase 50% among U.S. seniors by 2025

More 65+ global population than under 5, within three years

23-year old entrepreneur scores $22 million for anti-aging research investments

Gartner, Inc. says 55% of population would refuse to ride in a fully autonomous vehicle

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The Future This Week: May 29, 2017

The marketing division of the Sirius Cybernetics Corporation defines a robot as  “Your Plastic Pal Who’s Fun to Be With.”  The Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy defines the marketing division of the Sirius Cybernetic Corporation as “a bunch of mindless jerks who’ll be the first against the wall when the revolution comes.”–Douglas Adams, The Hitchhikers Guide to The Galaxy

Danger, Will Robinson!

The early images of robots were crude.  There was Robby the Robot in the 1956 scifi classic Forbidden Planet. His cousin, Robot B-9, on the campy mid 1960’s TV series Lost In Space, made famous the the catchphrase “danger Will Robinson.”   They look like cartoons to us today, compared, for example, to the chillingly lifelike Ava from 2015’s Ex Machinaor the robots so real in HBO’s Westworldit’s hard to tell who’s a human and who’s an android.  But how close are we to an invasion of robots of all kinds?  Some of this week’s stories would have one believe we are on the cusp.

Robby the Robot in Forbidden Planet

Robotics–The emirate of Dubai announced the roll out of the world’s first robotic policeman.   With it, they stated a goal of having these devices make up 25% of their security forces by 2030.  The robocop uses an array of cameras and sensors, along with sophisticated artificial intelligence, to go about its business.

Renewable Energy–The International Renewable Energy Agency (IRENA) issued a report stating that solar energy jobs in the U.S. grew at a rate 17 times faster than the economy a whole in 2016.  The report also mentioned strong growth in wind industry jobs, and projected employment in that sector to grow by about 40% from 2016 to 2020, while jobs related to fossil fuels will continue to decline.

Aerospace–Boeing has been awarded the contract to build the experimental XS-1, or Phantom Express, for DARPA (Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency).  The vehicle is designed as an autonomous rapid satellite launcher,  capable of being recycled and relaunched up to 10 times in 10 days.   It is slated for full operation by 2022.

Artificial Intelligence–A research team at NEMEC in Belgium has created a neuromorphic chip that mimics the activity of human neurons to compose music.  It does so by being exposed to various compositions and then copies the style.  It’s more practical future uses lie in medical sensors and personal electronics that learn the health and behavior of its users.

Urban Futures–Architect and urban futurist Cindy Frewen joined me for Seeking Delphi™ podcast #13 in a discussion of the urban landscape of the future. Watch and listen to the YouTube slide show or subscribe via any of the links below it.

A reminder that the Seeking Delphi™ podcast is available on iTunesPlayerFM and , and has a channel on YouTube.  You can also follow us on Facebook.