Podcast #8: Inventing The Local Future

“The best way to predict your future is to create it.”–Abraham Lincoln

“Think globally, act locally.”–Variously attributed

If you’ve never heard the phrase, “think globally, act locally,”  you’ve probably been living under a rock.  It’s origin is murky, but the concept is best attributed to Scottish town planner Patrick Geddes, and his 1915 book, Cities in Evolution.   100 years later,  Neil Richardson and Rick Smyre have written the 21st century blueprint for Communities of the Future, in their 2016 volume, Preparing for a World That Doesn’t Exist–Yet.  In my Seeking Delphi podcast interview with Neil Richardson,  we discuss many of the bold ideas in the book, including the authors’ call for enabling what they call a “second enlightenment.”   We also discuss three key points in the book–terms the authors coined–master capacity builder,  polycentric democracy and creative molecular economy.  Previous podcast episodes of Seeking Delphi have showcased technological quantum leaps that have the potential to cause radical upheaval of civilization.  Authors Richardson and Smyre point the way for small to medium organizations and communities to deal with it–to embrace, use, and grow with it.    A means to invent the local future.

Links to relevant stories and organizations appear after the audio file and embedded YouTube video below.  A reminder that Seeking Delphi is available on iTunes, and has a channel on YouTube.  You can also follow us on Facebook.  The YouTube video of Robot’s Delight is embedded below.

 

 

 

Episode #8: Inventing The Local Future 28:50

 

 

 

(YouTube slideshow)

Preparing For A World That Doesn’t Exist–Yet, on Amazon and Barnes & Noble

Emergent Action

Communities of The Future

European biocomputing project

India, China and Japan to increase coal usage through the 2020’s.

Facebook anti-suicide project

 

 

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Podcast #7, The 3D Printing Explosion: Cars, Homes, Even Human Bodies!

“Whatever good things we build end up building us.”– Jim Rohn

I can’t say for sure if the quote above was intended literally, but it is now becoming literally true.  The applications of additive manufacturing–better known as 3D printing–are expanding to include food, body parts, cars, and even entire buildings.  In this episode of the Seeking Delphi™  podcast, I talk with one of the gurus of this technology, Dr. Paul Tinari, of JOOM3D.com .  He’s working on a project the scope of which would have been unimaginable just a few years ago.

Links to relevant stories appear after the audio file and embedded YouTube video below.  A reminder that Seeking Delphi is available on iTunes, and has a channel on YouTube.  You can also follow us on Facebook.

 

 

 

 

 

Episode #7, Additive Manufacturing: We Are What We Print 21:07

 

(YouTube slideshow)

 

Paul Tinari Bio

Russian space agency recruiting cosmonauts for 2031 lunar landing mission

Ray Kurzweil revises his singularity forecast to 2029

The U.S. military seeks to “understand” its autonomous machines

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Podcast #6, Technology: The Good, The Bad and The Existential.

“We’ve arranged a civilization in which most crucial elements profoundly depend on science and technology.”–Carl Sagan

Here Be Dragons, Science Technology and The Future of Humanity
by Olle Häggström

Technology.  We certainly do depend on it.   It does great things for us, but it also can annoy us and, indeed, has the potential to do us outright harm.  In this episode of Seeking Delphi, I talk to author Olle Häggström about some of the existential risks that technology may pose to humanity.  His book, Here Be Dragons, is a thorough examination of a wide ranging inventory of potential dangers, from the ones we currently know and worry about (climate change, nuclear war), to the ones that yet might be (bio terrorism, nanotechnology, artificial intelligence) ,and the ones Hollywood fantasizes about (alien invasion).  Olle is a professor of mathematics at Chalmers University of Technology in Göteborg, Sweden.  I called him there to conduct the interview for this episode.

Links to relevant stories appear after the audio file and embedded YouTube video below.  A reminder that Seeking Delphi is available on iTunes, and has a channel on YouTube.  You can also follow us on Facebook.

 

 

 

 

 

Episode #6, Technology: The Good, The Bad, and The Existential  25:41

(YouTube slideshow)

Bigelow Aerospace plans to orbit lunar space station by 2020.

Blue Origin planning a lunar delivery service, a la Amazon.

Lawrence Berkeley lab doubles the number of materials potentially useful for solar fuels

Volkswagon unveils Sedric, its entry into the self-driving vehicle market.  (It looks like a breadbox on wheels.)

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Podcast #5: Teaching and Learning the Future

“Tell me and I will forget, teach me and I will remember, involve me and I will learn.”–Benjamin Franklin

“Those who can’t do, teach.  Those who can’t teach, teach gym.”–Woody Allen

teach-the-future-logoMy apologies to all you educators out there.  I just had to get that Woody Allen line in.  It makes sense, though, that teaching something as fluid, changing and uncertain as the future requires creative tools to involve the student and develop the appropriate mindset.  In episode #5 I talk with two individuals who are taking different approaches to the task.

Peter Bishop

Peter Bishop

The first interview is with career futurist educator, Peter Bishop, founder of Teach the Future.™  His aim is nothing less than to make future-think modules a standard in education.  I then talk with game developer Robert Mattox about his old school approach to involvement–a board game.  Appropriate links to all the subjects in this program can be found below the audio and YouTube files that follow.  A reminder that Seeking Delphi is available on iTunes, and has a channel on YouTube.  You can also follow us on Facebook.

 

 

Robert Mattox

Robert Mattox

Podcast #5: Teaching And Learning The Future, 26:50

Hope City

Hope City

 

 

 

 

Teach The Future

Hope City

Smart robots will outnumber people by 2050

McDonald’s to kill the drive-through with mobile ordering and curbside delivery.

SpaceX plans lunar tourism next year.

 

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Podcast #4: Technology Investing for the Future

“If [a stock] don’t go up, don’t buy it.”–Will Rogers

“The market will continue to fluctuate.”–Milton Fisher

 

We’d all like the perfect crystal ball to tell us where the financial markets are headed.  Sadly, no such thing exists.  But there is a tool that can be used to help evaluate specific technologies, relative to their stage of development.  In episode 4 of Seeking Delphi, I speak to professional futurist and financial manager Jim Lee about the Gartner Hype Cycle and how it might be used make better technology investing decisions.  To listen, click on the audio file below or the embedded YouTube link below that.    You can also subscribe on iTunes or YouTube.

jim-lee

 

 

Jim Lee

 

 

 

Episode #4: Technology Investing for the Future.

Jim Lee Bio

The Gartner Hype Cycle

The Gartner Hype Cycle

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Imperial College of London Longevity Study

George Church on reversal of aging

NASA exoplanet announcement

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Podcast Episode 3: Whatever Happened to Fuel Cells?

“I believe fuel cells could end the 100-year reign of the internal combustion engine.” –William Clay Ford

Hydrogen fuel cells have long been touted as a possible replacement for the internal combustion engine.  But progress has been slow,  and the emergence of this technology seems not much closer than it was 20 years ago.   In episode #3 of Seeking Delphi, I explore the world of Hydrogen Fuel Cells with William Smith, the CEO of Infinity Fuel Cell and Hydrogen, Inc.  The oil companies may not want you to hear this, but this technology is not dead yet.   Links to Infinity’s web site and this weeks news stories are below.  Seeking Delphi is now available on iTunes. Now also on YouTube.

William Smith

William Smith

 

 

 

 

 

Podcast episode 3: Whatever Happened to Fuel Cells , running time 22:13.

Infinity Fuel Cell and Hydrogen, Inc.

Turning exhaust into ink

New Dictionary Words

NASA’s commercial airlock

Venus-proof computer

Honda-GM fuel cell venture

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Podcast #2: The Abolition of Aging (part 2)

“I have aging as a disease.”–Elizabeth Parrish, CEO of Bioviva

In episode one of Seeking Delphi, the podcast, I spoke with David Wood, chair of  London Futurists, about his book The Abolition of Aging.  Specifically, we talked about his bold forecast of a 50% probability of widely available, affordable rejuvenation therapy being available by 2040.  In part two of my interview with David, we discuss a few of the wide ranging implications for society, should radical longevity extension become a reality.  Retirement, work, sustainability and the meaning of life itself are all in play.

 

 

 

David Wood

 

David Wood bio

The Abolition of Aging on Amazon.com

Mark Fields, Ford CEO, interview with Business Insider

Business Insider story on renewable energy job growth

GM/Honda joint fuel cell venture, as reported by Motley Fool

Prepare for the 25 hour day

 

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