Podcast #15: Wearable Technology and The Future of Pregnancy

“If pregnancy were a book, they’d cut the last two chapters.”–Nora Ephron

It seems that every other person is wearing a fitness tracker these days.  I am one of them.   But wearable bio-medical devices aren’t just for normal activity.  They are being developed, marketed, and used to monitor a variety of health conditions,  seemingly for just about everything and everyone. Now–yes–even unborn babies have a wearable health monitor.   Developed an marketed by San Francisco-based Bloomlife,  it tracks a variety of parameters during the course of pregnancy.  You might call it a fitness tracker for the unborn baby.

In this episode,  Bloomlife CEO and co-founder, Eric Dy,  talks about the origin and functions of their breakthrough device,  where it and the market for wearable health trackers are going,  and how he and his partner won a trip to Neckar Island–just one of three companies out of 1300 competing in a tech innovation contest–to present to Richard Branson

 

 

Links to relevant stories appear after the audio file and embedded YouTube video below.  A reminder that Seeking Delphi is available on iTunes, PlayerFM, and has a channel on YouTube.  You can also follow us on Facebook.

The Bloomlife tracker in action

Episode #15: A Fitness Tracker for The Unborn Baby

 

YouTube slides show of Seeking Delphi podcast #15

 

 

 

Bloomlife wins extreme tech innovation competition

Incidence of hunger to increase 50% among U.S. seniors by 2025

More 65+ global population than under 5, within three years

23-year old entrepreneur scores $22 million for anti-aging research investments

Gartner, Inc. says 55% of population would refuse to ride in a fully autonomous vehicle

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APF Minicast #2: Global Health Futures, July 28, 2017

“Happiness is nothing more than good health and a bad memory.”–Albert Schweitzer

Today’s sessions at the Association of Professional Futurist’s annual meeting in Seattle, Washington, consisted of morning sessions on efforts to improve human health in the third world.  It included talks from Brian Arbogast of the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation, on transforming sanitation; Sarah Chesemore, also of the Bill and Melinda Gates foundation, on the future of vaccine delivery; and Jan Flowers, research scientist and clinical faculty member at the University of Washington, on dissemination of health informatics programs in resource constrained settings.  They provide brief summaries of their work in today’s mini-cast.

 

APF 2017 mini-cast #2: Global Health Futures

 

2017 APF minicast#2 (YouTube): Global Health Futures

Seeking Delphi is available on iTunes, PlayerFM, and has a channel on YouTube.  You can also follow us on Facebook.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Subscribe to Seeking Delphi™ on iTunes 

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